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How to Create a STEM Corner at Home

These days, entertaining children at home can be a daunting and exhausting task for parents. But inspiring and inviting children to STEM’ing can be easily accomplished with a simple change at home. Here is a suggestion on how to accomplish that, frugally!

First

Find an area of the house that is empty, accessible, and it is seen often. Here is an example of a space-our hallway.

Second

Once you have a suitable area, find a shelf that fits into that space. The ideal shelf is one that is about the height of your child. If you don’t have an available shelf, this is a great and very economical option. {Affiliate link at no additional cost to you.}

Third

Find simple materials around your house that you don’t mind your child destroying. Add recyclables and some basic tools to the pile. Then,  neatly organize them on the shelf. Hint: don’t crowd the shelf with things! The goal is to provide an invitation-it doesn’t need to have everything your child might use.

Here are some suggestions of things you may already have at home:

  • glue
  • ruler
  • paper
  • scissors
  • tape
  • cork
  • yarn
  • index cards
  • toothpicks
  • deck of cards
  • sponge
  • hot glue gun

Fourth

The fourth step is to place things on the shelf. We used simple wooden trays to confine things. Wooden trays are also an easy way to transport things from and to the shelf. Look at the picture of our finished shelf. What do you think? Does it look inviting? 

 

Fifth

Finally, add an engineering book that inspires your child to be creative. There are our favorite choices! 

We would love for your to feel empowered to create a little STEM’ing nook. Leave a comment below and let us know about your success story.

Published by Reizelie Barreto, PhD

Reizelie is a former homeschool parent and a trained science and Montessori teacher with a passion for curriculum development. She loves learning and teaching and on her spare time she helps families create home environments that enrich a child's learning. Reizelie has a PhD in science education and has been working in the field of education for the last 19 years. She loves helping teachers, schools, and homeschooling families improve their science curriculum in ways that are authentic to scientists' work.

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